neck lift

Full necklift before and one day after surgery.

Definitions differ from doctor to doctor on a procedure and the “mini” version of said procedure. Same thing with neck lift and a mini neck lift. However, these general principals hold true in regards to a neck lift regardless of treating surgeon.

 

So what’s the difference between a neck lift and a mini neck lift?

A necklift or mini necklift seek to address skin, fat and muscle. In general, a mini necklift consists of an incision within the crux of the neck, behind the chin. This horizontal incision is well hidden. This is the only incision in a mini necklift. Through this incision, your surgeon can perform liposuction and tighten the neck muscle called the platysma. Specifically, they will perform a corset platysmaplasty which tightens the neck muscle like a corset. Read more about this part of the procedure here.

 

The important distinction with a mini necklift (as seen in the photo below) is that no skin is removed. However, if you have a little excess skin, this can be treated and hidden with a mini necklift by redraping the neck skin. Explained another way, think of a crumpled-up sheet on your bed. When you lift the sheet in the air to spread it over the bed, the sheet redrapes over the bed and smoothes out across the bed. You have reduced or removed any part of the sheet. And in the same way, you can redrape the existing skin across the neck so that it smoothes out.

neck lift

Example of a mini neck lift with only an incision behind the chin.

 

By comparison, if you have a lot of excess skin like the patient at the top, you have to remove skin. In addition to the incision behind the chin to tighten the muscle, incisions are made behind the ears to remove the skin. In this sense, it’s a “fuller,” more extensive necklift. A full necklift also requires a drain because there is so much more space that can fill with fluid.

 

Enjoy this video of a full (non-mini) neck lift!

 

To check pricing on a necklift or mini necklift from Dr. Kaplan, click here.

 

Click here for the original blog post written by Dr. Jonathan Kaplan for BuildMyBod.