braIf I had a nickel for every time a patient asked me what bra size they would be after their breast augmentation surgery, I’d probably have about $250 (you can do the math)! The problem has always been and will continue to be that bra sizes are different between manufacturers so I can’t tell them definitively what cup size they will be.

 

No, that bra size is not accurate!

Apparently Victoria’s Secret tends to overestimate all women’s breasts. For example, the patient above has 315cc shaped (read: teardrop) silicone implants. She contacted me after her surgery to let me know that she was fitted for a DD bra! While I recognize the tag on her bra may have shown a DD, those are not DD breasts. I reminded her how happy she was after surgery and before she was fitted for the new bra and that a piece of fabric showing her bra size shouldn’t change that fact. She was relieved with that reasoning.

 

Because of this discrepancy between manufacturers, I avoid guaranteeing what cup size a patient will be after surgery. I’ve also noticed the discrepancy between manufacturers is only going to get worse. Whereas before most bras came from big-box stores, more and more online stores are coming on the scene. And these stores stratify the size issue even moreso, taking into account not only cup size and girth but also length of torso. With so many more variables to contend with, the best I can do is guess a patient will be a big C or small D.

 

More importantly, I don’t want patients to fixate on the cup size because it’s important how the implant size fits your body, not just your bra. As discussed in this post, the 315cc shaped silicone implant above looks very natural on a woman that is 5 foot, 7 inches tall. But that would probably be too big on someone 5’0″. So don’t just consider cup size, consider “you” size!

 

To check breast augmentation cost before seeing Dr. Kaplan, click here.

 

Click here for the original blog post written by Dr. Jonathan Kaplan for BuildMyBod.